Tagged: #ukcare

Digital technology and new models of support for older people

A new report by Shirley Ayres for Nominet Trust outlines the issues we’re facing in an ageing society and explores the potential of online digital communications technology to address these issues. As well as Shirley’s invaluable insights, this report provides a comprehensive review of the evidence and research in this area and cites innovative projects already under way.

It focuses on well-being, independence and prevention through access, connection and inclusivity. She makes the vital point early on that digital technology cannot replace human contact, kindness, empathy and understanding but it does allow people to connect in different ways, quickly and easily.

Feeling connected and having supportive social relationships has a strong link to health and longevity. Isolation, loneliness, physical and mental health challenges are important social challenges facing society as a whole. And for older people in particular, isolation is a major factor impacting on their well-being and life expectancy.

Social media has made an impact on the way many of us communicate, collaborate and share knowledge and information – whether that is with friends and family, colleagues or complete strangers. Online engagement is a powerful way to draw connections between people that may have never met, but who share many of the same life experiences and interests.

Challenges for social care

‘Older people’ are not a homogenous group, they’re as varied in their needs and interests as individuals in any other sector of the population.

Technology provides many different ways of connecting people and resources. This should enable the design and delivery of appropriate care services that help to celebrate and value the life experience and wisdom offered by the older people they are supporting.

Shirley also addresses issues of digital inclusion. Government plans to deliver more services ‘digital by default’ have created challenges for social care including disparity of Internet access and digital literacy.

The use of technology for enabling social contact and participation can be very successful, but many older people need a little help to start using digital technology – plus ongoing support

Recommendations

The report calls for a more holistic approach to ageing, taking into account not only the complex needs of older individuals but also those of individuals with care responsibilities. It champions better integration of service provision and collaboration between the digital tech industry, academics, care providers and people who use care services.

Care and support in a digital society needs to have a different focus which challenges the perceptions of older people as being a ‘burden’ and promotes the benefits of technology to enable people to live more independent, safe and fulfilling lives.

She concludes with a number of recommendations, including:

  • Developing from the ground up an independent Community Wellbeing and Social Technology Hub which takes advantage of the technology which it reports on and supports all stakeholders to to share resources in discoverable ways
  • Carers and care seekers need to access information and support online more easily
  • A more joined-up approach to digital inclusion and a more open way of working to avoid expensive and unnecessary duplication of pilots
  • Digital tech innovation showcase events

The full report can be found here.

Tweeting while watching TV is one of the easiest ways to assert yourself as a leader in your field

During BBC Panorama 8.30pm-9pm on 23rd May 2012, Elderly Care and #panorama were trending highly on Twitter in the UK, which means more people were using Twitter to talk about this one TV programme than anything else. Panorama is a popular programme so when I heard that last night’s episode was on a hot topic (the failing care system in the UK) I suspected this might happen. 

Since they would have been watching it anyway, we agreed that JRHT‘s Director of Care Services John KennedyJRF‘s Deputy Director of Policy & Research Nancy Kelley and JRF/JRHT Head of Media Abigail Scott Paul would tweet a bit of commentary/analysis/professional-opinion at the same time. I was also watching and retweeting some of their tweets from the corporate JRF account.

The purpose of this is to ensure that the expertise of JRF and JRHT is represented in the conversations taking place on topics we have experience/expertise in. Tweeting during TV programmes is one of the easiest ways to assert JRF and JRHT as leaders in our fields because we know that thousands of other people will also be watching those TV programmes and following the hashtag. I see this as part of JRHT’s commitment to influencing by demonstrating best practice.

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Housing and care staff require clear guidelines for social media use

Enthusiastic staff who embrace Twitter are often not supported by their employers and left unsure of what they can share

This blog originally appeared on the Guardian.co.uk

Housing and care staff are finding Twitter a very useful tool, but the lack of guidelines for staff usage is leaving employees feeling vulnerable about what they can say. This is what I’ve learned recently from speaking to various people from different organisations. They told me about what they use Twitter for, the risks, the rewards and why all organisations need a policy and guidelines for social media use.

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