Tagged: chief executive

What the Chief Executive needs to know about social media

Below is something I wrote for work. The chief exec is referred to here as she/her because I had our chief exec in mind when I wrote it. If you think I’ve left anything out or disagree with anything, please leave me a comment.

If the chief exec uses no other social media tools, she should invest in:

· Blogs
· Twitter
· LinkedIn

Taken and used in conjunction with one another, these tools can help the chief exec to achieve the following social media objectives:

1. to further develop her online profile;
2. to further develop her online network.

Blogs are a vital tool for anyone whose job it is to convey messages. They are a simple way to keep people informed and up-to-date with your professional activity. A blog can be used to give a human face and voice to an organisation or brand – essential for communicating messages online. A blog allows the author to:

  • assert her authority in her field, and used regularly;
  • help to maintain her (professional) profile and/or build on it online;
  • raise awareness of her current areas of focus, creating opportunities for conversation/collaboration.

See also: Why all non-profits should have a blog – a good one

Twitter is a simple networking tool which works on the sharing of information as currency. It is a public aspect to the chief exec’s profile that enables people to identify and connected with her online. When the chief exec is identifiable on Twitter and using it effectively she and the organisation appears more engaged, transparent and authentic. Not being identifiable on Twitter and using it effectively means a chief exec increasingly runs the risk of appearing out-of-touch or unwilling to present themselves publicly for some reason.

Using Twitter effectively requires time and dedication and doesn’t yield evident results immediately. It can take a while to find your feet and establish a useful network but Twitter becomes more meaningful, the more you use it. In order to develop a meaningful network, the chief exec must be active on Twitter, frequently tweeting links to news and developments in her field – a public demonstration that she is in touch. Other Twitter users will then follow her because she is demonstrating that she’s an authority in her field and her tweets are therefore more credible. When someone contacts the chief exec on Twitter, she should respond publicly where possible, because this demonstrates that she is engaging outside of any professional bubble.

Building a meaningful network on Twitter is a worthwhile investment for when the chief exec has a message to communicate. If she tweets a link to a new blog post, for example, her following will help circulate the message within any other networks that have a stake.

Used effectively, Twitter also offers a personalised filter for information/media – you should follow people who tweet content that makes your Timeline a relevant and useful knowledge-pool, a ‘go-to’ source of information/media, and/or could provide a meaningful answer to a question if you tweeted it.

More blogs about Twitter

LinkedIn is a professional social network that makes it very easy to find and (re)connect with anyone you have had a direct professional connection with. As with Twitter, these people are likely to help spread a message when you have something to communicate.

While there are various things one can do with LinkedIn, a great advantage is it requires minimal time and effort to maintain once your profile is complete. In the very least, LinkedIn ensures you always have a very simple way to contact anyone in your extended professional network, as they do you.

It also provides a standard professional ‘About Me’ webpage and makes your name more searchable, which raises your online profile and creates more opportunities for people to find out about you and your work.

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